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Counselling

Acknowledging what has happened, and accepting how life has changed is an important step in the recovery process and talking treatments can help with this. Psychological and counselling services aim to encourage you to talk about your thoughts and feelings and help you to come to terms with what has happened to you. With the guidance of your psychologist or counsellor, you will have the opportunity to look at how the stroke has affected your life and discover ways of moving forward. Having the space to talk things through at your own pace can be very helpful. You will gain a clearer picture of what lies ahead and help you feel more in control of life by working out and trying to find solutions to problems. Many people benefit from talking through their difficulties, but if your stroke has left you with problems communicating or understanding others, it may not be the best option, or you may require the specialist skills of a Speech and Language Therapist. Your GP may be able to refer you to a local HSE psychology or counselling service. Some GPs have a counsellor as part of their practice. There are also community adult mental health, and older adult mental health teams to which you can be referred. However, these services may not be available in all areas, and there may be a waiting list. Therapy is also available privately (the cost varies between therapists but can be quite expensive). There may also be local organisations which offer counselling, sometimes at a reduced cost, so it is worth checking in your telephone directory or at your local library for more local contacts.

Design & Development by Interesource Group (Ireland) Limited